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Quest Rogue: Not so eww…

So the meta has fixed itself, more people have good plays against Quest Rogue that it no longer seems as cheesy as it had been a couple of days ago. This is good. Good enough for me to write more on it and post a deck up.

Before we go on further, let’s see why Quest Rogue is no longer a big threat now (well, it still is, but not as it was before):

The board is cleared up early. No longer targeting the face, every effort is spent targeting the weenie minions on the board instead to render the Crystal Core useless even if it hits the table.

Aggro face like no tomorrow. Rogues in general are very poor in the defense department. Even more so in Quest Rogue.

Dirty Rat is back. Sure, it sucks against Jade when it was prevalent, but against Quest Rogues it wrecks the game plan more often than not.

People are packing fatties. This is to trade for the weenie minions that plague the Rogue’s table prior to completing the quest.

Now let’s see the deck’s main problems:

It’s too draw dependant. Seriously, an opening hand without 1 of your key cards and you can literally see the writing on the wall.

The deck relies heavily on completing the quest to win. Quite often, there are no secondary win conditions.

The second problem is the biggest flaw in current Quest Rogue decks so far. Without the Crystal Core, your Violet Teacher and Imp Master aren’t scaring anyone if they’re only spewing 1/1 at best. Quite often the fancy win cards are locked until the Crystal Core comes online. So until the quest is completed, the deck is pretty much vulnerable to anything.

It hit me after losing a lot successively that the deck was too transparent. So, like the class implies, winning with the quest now requires more guile and concealment of your motives than every before. I came across 2 play styles that work surprisingly well of late:

  1. Don’t play The Caverns Below on your first turn. This will ensure you Igneous Elemental won’t be top targets of Silence, turned into toads and sheeps the moment they hit the table. Drop it when you’re about to score it.
  2. Don’t make a deck relying on the Crystal Core to win. Treat the Crystal Core as a secondary win condition while concentrating on winning by another mean. You don’t need to complete the quest to win, though it’d be nice if it did. This should be your mentality as your opponent gets confused on why you used Shadowstep on another minion and not on the one you just cast.
  3. Play like classic Rogue. The old doctrine of controlling the board and dropping your own threats should still be maintained and not be thrown to the wind for the sake of dropping your 4 same name minions ASAP.

Here’s the deck I’m playing right now. It could use more work, but it’s making me feel fun playing a quest deck for once:

questrogue

There is no straight way on how to play this deck, but you can vary your approach depending on which class you’re facing.