Category Archives: rpg

My Pathfinder character

It’s not really a good one. In fact, it’s pretty tough to play and one reckless play might have to see me let this character to go and die in the next 1 or 2 sessions if i’m not careful. In short, I’m playing Lona, a 3rd Level Human Rogue in my recent Pathfinder campaign and I’m trying to build her into a ninja-like character without taking the class, since we’re not using the advanced rules and sticking to core at the moment.

Here’s what she has:
STR 15
DEX 16
CON 5
INT 11
WIS 14
CHA 8

That score of 5… ugh… it’s very tough to decide where to put it that is NOT Charisma or Wisdom, which is seen by many as dump stats for a Rogue. So why did I put it there? Well, I can’t give my Charisma too much of a hit because I might need to use the Bluff skill to do into Stealth immediately after in case I’m cornered. And Wisdom is just too valuable when you’re the one that’s relied upon to spot traps and detect lies.

Since not all rogues are created equal, mine in Lawful Neutral. She’s lawful in the sense that she’s obligated to finish any task she has taken up to the letter and won’t budge until that is done, which I think is a fair representation of a ninja following her lord’s orders or taking up his charge. Also another reason is to splash her into Monk later down the road and taking the Exotic Weapon: Shuriken feat upon reaching character level 5. The real question lies if she’ll go back and forth between Rogue and Monk or just follow the Monk path for a few levels before splashing back in.

But of course, she currently has Ghoul Fever after foolishly running forward to recon upcoming enemies, which was really really stupid. With a Con of 5, she’ll be alive for 2 days at worst and 5 days at best, with 3 days being the average. Her Dex is going to take a similar hit as well so I’m really curious if I can hold out before finding a Cure Disease potion before kicking the bucket. Hopefully I can.

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Free RPG Day! Fae Edge, the single page RPG

Written based on the FUDGE mechanic. Fae Edge is an rpg set in a dark world where faeries live and fight for survival in a harsh and forbidding world. They constructed fortress cities to protect themselves, but the machinations of various factions threaten to ruin their home from within as they try to come out on top and rule these cities in their own glory.

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B4a76HKioRdqanVzMFBocnJpeVU/edit?usp=sharing

No detailed setting information yet, just the core mechanics. I kind of like making this single page document and seeing it in print. It’s ready to be played right out of the box, though you need an experienced GM to really fill the world in at this stage. Expect to see more world setting documents fleshing out the world of Fae Edge in the future.

 

D&D Next! Sharing my character creation experience. (+5 xp)

So I got into the D&D Next play test thing and tried out the character creation process. I’m in love with it. Though it still takes a complete session to build one, but the end result is a mix of 2nd ed (which is my favourite edition btw) and 3rd ed. It’s not as contrite as 3rd ed but it is just as modular.

Skills and Feats are now packaged for more easier play and the classes also have packages of their own as well. Selecting equipment can be as easy as picking the packages and go or by slogging through the list yourself. Either one works fine. Skill checks are now Ability checks but you can add your Skill Die to enhance your roll for trained skills.

There’s also a new concept of advantage/disadvantage rolls which is simply rolling another die and choosing the higher/lower one, which is an elegant mechanic.

So, what did all this come up to?

My expert High Elven Hammerguard (this is a custom made Fighter package), who follows the rules like a good boy AND is one hell of a cook. He also belongs to a culinary guild house and the Hammerguard expeditionary force. And oh yes, he uses a warhammer and shield, not one of those namby pamby pig stickers.

Start playtesting here, folks:

http://www.wizards.com/dnd/dndnext.aspx

Of Dice and Men: Episode 1

Keeping a campaign going in an RPG is not an easy thing. Scheduling games and keeping players in line is like herding cats. Which is not to say impossible, but rather that you need very well trained cats. Miss a session and everyone ends up forgetting what they were doing the last time they played, carefully made notes vanish into the abyss and those two guys who weren’t really paying attention suddenly have lives.

On the other hand, if you’re lucky enough to have dedicated players, your life as a game master is made so much easier. Being a dedicated player isn’t just knowing to show up on time, always having your character sheet and telling your GM in advance if you can’t make it. It’s about understanding your role in the story.

A players role in the game is to help everyone have a good time and keep things moving along. Little things like not interrupting each other, and paying attention when NPCs talk can go a long way in making an RPG session more enjoyable. A slightly less obvious part of being a player is creating a character that fits the story or the setting.

It’s easy to get carried away when creating a character. Everyone wants to play what they think will be the coolest frood. But that’s not always the best thing for the game. Sure your dual wielding elf ninja who shoots arrows of pure darkness might be your idea of what you want to play. But does he really fit the setting? What role does an elf ninja have in the story? Why does he even exist?

There is no need for every character to be a massive dissertation, but there is a need to establish some basic ideas. GMs and players should work together to craft an adventuring party that fits into the idea of what the setting calls for, and what everyone at the table wants to play.

This convergence of wants will ease the narrative and make the whole experience more immersive. It will also help with bringing the players back to the table if there’s been a long break and nobody can remember what was going on.

In the end, an RPG campaign is all about cooperative storytelling. With an emphasis on cooperative. If that doesn’t exist, then maybe you should think about playing something else.